This Week with The Professor: The One Post

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This week The Professor warns us on the draw back’s of betting the “one post”.

“The Professor”

Handicapping Tips

The One Post

 

In some bettor’s eyes the #1 post position is always a positive for the greyhound that draws it, but this is not always the case. This post can be helpful to speed hounds or rail running late speed dogs, but can also be a drawback for others. Some greyhounds are intimidated by being pinned to the rail early and don’t rush as well from that post. Others may prefer to rush wide and try and work their way outside before getting going. The #1 post is always going to be over bet, so use this to your advantage. If you have discovered a dog that does not care for this post and will be bet heavily, try and beat that greyhound by betting others that you prefer. If the dog beats you, take comfort in the fact that the payout will be low and even if you had bet that dog, the profit would have been negligible.

 

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could be like Pete and receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

For more greyt tips, tricks, and handicapping knowledge, be sure to tune in to our podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel!

This Week with The Professor: A couple of Angles

This week, The Professor goes over a few angles and patterns he has noticed with his years of experience.

I am going to talk about of a couple of angle plays that I have found to be useful when betting on the hounds.

The first one is that I have found to be true more often than not is the beaten favorite angle. How many times have you thought a greyhound looked so good in a race and then they run a lousy race and left you scratching your head, only to run a monster the next out when they don’t figure as much?

I am betting a lot of times.

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Why not turn that to your advantage, recognize that angle and play that dog back at bigger odds? The old expression is “be there for the wedding and not the funeral”, meaning bet when the dog wins and not when he loses. One reason could be that a trainer may notice the poor effort of the favorite and work on that dog for the next out.

The second angle is that a dog that runs two seconds in a row, will run out of the money in their next start. This may not be rooted in logic, but it does seem to hold true a lot. I have tried to find reasons for this to be happening, but have not been able to do so. These are a couple of angles that you may want to keep in mind when looking at a race.

 

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

Tune in to our new podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel, for news and more greyt tips from The Professor.

The Week with The Professor: Grade Theory Q & A

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Last time, The Professor discussed the influences of race distances on greyhound running styles, and gave us good tips to remember when handicapping.

We received a great question from Pete T. who asked, “I generally handicap by grade first, and I read somewhere that the higher the grade, the wider the ability gap between grades. For instance, according to this theory, it would be easier for a greyhound to move from D to C than from B to A. Do you agree with this theory, and if so, how does it affect your grade handicapping? Thanks!

Thanks for asking, Pete! Let’s check in with The Professor for his thoughts.

Good question! Pete, I do agree with this theory. I believe that the higher the grade, the more difficult it is for the greyhound to succeed in that higher grade.

The difference between grade D and C is not as large as the difference between grade B and A. You regularly see greyhounds moving from D to C and finding success, but less regularly doing well when going from C to B grades.

I have found that the biggest difference in talent and success is between grade B and grade A. Hounds that are solid in B struggle mightily when raised to A. The greyhounds that are what we call solid A dogs will consistently run in the money in that grade and usually win right away when they drop to B.

This is especially noticeable when a pup goes up the ladder quickly and then runs in grade A. It takes an exceptionally talented pup to succeed in A right away. It usually takes some time for them to adjust to the speed of those greyhounds.

I would say that this is a major factor when I handicap, and have made some nice scores by beating a hot pup who will always be overbet when reaching grade A.

 

Thanks for your question, Pete! Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could be like Pete and receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

For more greyt tips, tricks, and handicapping knowledge, be sure to tune in to our podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel!

 

 

This Week with The Professor: Distance Changes

This week, we check in with The Professor for some tips on how the distance of the race and the running style of the greyhound are related.

Today,  we will discuss how to handle greyhounds changing distances. When a greyhound is changing distances,  there are several possible reasons. They may be running short races and closing well, but not getting up in time. They may be breaking well, but not carrying their speed enough to clear the turn in a sprint. The reverse would be a greyhound that has been running longer races and getting tired, needs freshening,  or a new distance all together.

So what does all this mean?

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First, let me say that it is a risky proposition to play a dog that has never run a distance race in their first start at that longer distance. Not necessarily because they cannot run longer, but because they are used to running around two turns and the added turn can cause confusion.

I would let them have a start and see how they do, then evaluate their chances as they tend to improve greatly that second start. This can be a great value play. In regard to distance hounds going back to shorter races, that is not usually a problem as all dogs start their career running shorter races.

What to look for is how much early speed they have in the shorter races (and previous efforts in the sprint races) to evaluate their chances in that shorter race. Be wary, though, as some trainers are just giving the dog a couple of races to maybe get downgraded and get a short rest without taking them off the track completely. Also, don’t be fooled by thinking that the distance greyhounds are going to show that kind of speed against sprinters, who are generally faster early.

 

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

Tune in to our new podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel, for news and more greyt tips from The Professor.

This Week with The Professor: Running Time a Major Factor?

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Seeing a pup’s race time on a program can give you a general idea of their performance. But is a greyhound’s running time a major handicapping factor? Here’s what The Professor has to say about it.

Generally, a greyhound’s running time is not a major handicapping factor. There are a few reasons that this is not a major, or even an important, factor when handicapping a race. The next time you’re handicapping and trying to make heads or tails of the greyhound’s race time, keep the following in mind.

Reason one: The greyhound’s time will be affected by the track racing surface. The surface varies from one day to the next, depending on weather or how the track was conditioned by track maintenance.

Reason two: The greyhound’s time will be affected by how the race is actually run. In a race with a lot of trouble or maneuvering, the time will be slower than a race would be without trouble. It is common to see a lower grade race being run faster than a higher grade race because of how the race was run.

Reason three: Early speed dogs will generally have faster times than pups who are closers because they do not have to maneuver around other dogs during the race.

A common saying among top greyhound handicappers is, “Time is only a factor if you are catching a plane.”

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

Tune in to our new podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel, for news and more greyt tips from The Professor.

This Week with The Professor: “Resulters” & Negativity

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This week, we check in with The Professor for tips on being confident with your choices. Don’t second guess yourself. Let a loss go and stay positive!

One of the things I discovered when I started playing the races was that you must have a couple of traits to be a consistent winner. One of those traits is to have confidence, and also, be positive. You must believe that you are good at what you are doing.

Don’t be afraid to play the greyhounds you like, regardless of the odds. I believe in the saying, “if you are afraid of losing, you WILL lose.”

Another trait that is necessary is the ability to let a loss go and move on. This is where the term “resulter” comes from. A “resulter” is someone who is always complaining about the last race; they should have won, but didn’t. This promotes negativity and is a sure way to bankruptcy. Watch the replay of the race to see why your selection won or lost, learn from it, and move on.

This same principle holds true in sports. The players who are successful are the ones who can learn from a mistake, then forget about it and not dwell on the negative.  Always try to be positive and you will reap the rewards.

 

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

Tune in to our new podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel, for news and more greyt tips from The Professor.

 

 

This Week with The Professor: Trip Handicapping

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This week, The Professor discusses the importance of spending time to study your favorite greyhounds prior to post. Let’s see what trip handicapping is all about and how it might help you score your next payout.

By far the best way to win while wagering on greyhounds is “trip handicapping.”

If you have spent any time at the track you will have noticed some people carefully watching replays of the previous race. Generally, this is not to revel in a win or cry about a loss. Rather, it is to see what happened during the race which may have affected the performance of each greyhound in the race.

It is also to chart the tendencies of each greyhound: breaking ability, whether the hound runs inside or outside, and the racing sense of each dog.

A serious gambler will keep notes on each greyhound as to their tendencies and troubled trips. He or she will apply that knowledge when wagering. This gives that person serious advantage over the general public trying to pick winners strictly on the past performance lines on the program.

Remember, we offer free live video and race replays directly on our website. Check out our handy how-to video on how to watch races:

If you are just an occasional player and do not have the time or energy to trip handicap, feel free to check out my other articles for more handicapping tips.

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

This Week with The Professor: Irish Racing

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Last week, our friend David N. had a question about Irish greyhound racing:

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Greyt question, David! Let’s see what The Professor has to say on the subject:

First, let me admit that I am not an expert on Irish racing but I will attempt to give you some information that may be helpful. There are several differences between American and Irish greyhound racing.

In the USA, we have 8 and 9 runners in a race. In Ireland, the maximum number of runners in a race is 6. In the USA, the post positions are determined by random draw. In Ireland, the dogs are seeded by running style. The inside runners are given inside posts and the wide runners are given outside posts. This is determined by the racing secretary.

The racing blankets are slightly different as well:

  • Trap 1 = Red with white numeral
  • Trap 2 = Blue with white numeral
  • Trap 3 = White with black numeral
  • Trap 4 = Black with white numeral
  • Trap 5 = Orange with black numeral
  • Trap 6 = Black & white stripes with red numeral

The kennel system is different as well. In the USA, each track will “book” or give a contract to a certain number of kennels to run greyhounds at that track. You must have a “booking” at that track to run greyhounds there. In Ireland, you must register your kennel with the Irish Racing Board, and you may run at any track that the greyhound qualifies for.

The grading systems are completely different. Rather than try to explain this, I’ve found the website for the Irish Greyhound Board, which has a lot of information to explain the Irish racing system. The Irish Greyhound Board‘s website will also help decipher the Irish racing programs as well, since they are also vastly different.

Thanks to David N. for this question! He has received a $2 credit to his Greyhound Channel wagering account.

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

This Week with The Professor: Does Size Matter?

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Have you ever wondered if a greyhound’s size affects their overall racing performance? Here are some of The Professor’s thoughts on the subject.

Generally speaking, the size or sex of a greyhound is not a factor when handicapping a race.

Unlike thoroughbred racing, the female greyhounds compete on an even footing with the males. There may be times when a smaller greyhound may find their chances compromised by having larger hounds pinning them in or pushing them out but this is not common enough to be a major factor.

It has long been a belief that the top sprinters are generally in the 65-80 pound range and that the top distance greyhounds are smaller. There is some evidence of this in high stakes competition and you see females winning top distance races more frequently than sprints, but using it as a major handicapping factor can be tricky.

One caveat is that some greyhounds are more nervous before the races and can lose considerable weight in the “lockout” kennels where the greyhounds are kept before racing. Sometimes these hounds have a designation of WL (weight loser) after their name. These greyhounds will generally perform better in earlier races on the program, so keep an eye out for that.

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

This Week with The Professor: Bridge Jumping vs. Pool Manipulation

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Last week on This Week with The Professor, we received a question about pool and odds manipulation. Can what appears to be manipulation be chalked up to honest confusion or is it something more dastardly?

QuestionPoolAndOddsManipulationGreyt question, David! Let’s see what The Professor has to say on the subject:

There has been some reporting of possible pool manipulation lately, so I thought it would be a good time to discuss the difference between that and “bridge jumping.”

Pool manipulation is something that originated many years ago when several Las Vegas and Reno casinos tried booking bets on greyhound races. The person or persons who were doing this had someone at the track make large win, place, or show wagers on non-contenders. Because the pools were so small, when those dogs ran out of the money, the payoffs on the winning dogs were huge. Another person in the group would have made large wagers on the logical dogs at the casino, thus reaping big profits. This was quickly spotted and the casinos either stopped booking those bets, set low limits on the amount you could bet, or restricted win, place, and show bets entirely.

Another form of pool manipulation is what has happened on a few occasions lately –   someone makes a big win/place wager on a logical big favorite and then cancels the wagers at the last minute. This has an effect on the final odds. It discourages people from wagering on the dog because the odds are so low, so the final odds are inflated to what they should be. If someone is making a large wager offshore with a service that books wagers, they receive a payoff which is larger than it should be. The tracks usually keep an eye on this and shut down this practice quickly.

“Bridge jumping” is the practice of someone making a very large wager on a prohibitive favorite, usually to show, attempting to get a 5% return on money wagered. The people who attempt this are called “Bridge Jumpers” because if they lose the large wager trying to make a small profit, they may want to go jump off a bridge.

Thanks to David L. for this question! He has received a $2 credit to his Greyhound Channel wagering account.

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!