This Week With The Professor: All About Those Odds

Today, The Professor talks about odds and how you shouldn’t let them scare you, even if the hound you’re betting isn’t getting any action.

I have seen, over the years, friends of mine who may handicap a race well, find a greyhound with high odds that has a great chance, then get scared off wagering on that dog because nobody else is playing them. What? Is that not the whole point – to be able to see something in a longshot that few others see

My theory on why this happens is that this person also plays the horses, where if the horse is not being played as much as they should, it is said they are “dead on the board.” Many believe that this means the smart guys, or stable money, is not being played on the horse because the horse may not be sound. This is not an issue with greyhounds. Greyhounds grade themselves by their performance; whereas, in horse racing, the owner or trainer decides what class the horse runs in. Trust me when I say that the owners or trainers of greyhounds are the worst bettors on the track, so the fact they are not betting on them means nothing.

The point I am trying to make is have confidence in your handicapping and if the odds are high on your selection, all the better, bet more. There are no “wise guys” when it comes to greyhound racing, which is the beauty of it.

pawprints

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured! Tune into our podcast, Catch the Action with Greyhound Channel, for news and more greyt tips from The Professor.

2 thoughts on “This Week With The Professor: All About Those Odds

    1. Hi Tommy! Thanks for the greyt question. Once a horse leaves the starting gate, it is considered a starter, even if the jockey falls off, loses his irons, or the horse breaks down and cannot finish. The only time a horse can be deemed a non-starter in a race is if he/she received an unfair start out of the gate (e.g., was held onto by a member of the gate crew).

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