Wednesday Wisdom: Myth Busted #3

Today’s Wednesday Wisdom is bringing you another busted myth from our pals at Greyhound Facts to help expand your greyhound racing knowledge, whether you are an experienced greyhound racing spectator or are new to the sport.

Myth: The first time greyhounds see other dog breeds is when they are adopted and become pets.

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Fact: It’s a misconception that greyhounds have never seen other dog breeds until they are adopted. Greyhounds are often raised on farms with other dog breeds as well as other animals such as horses.

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Greyhound Facts is a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Their mission is to provide a place to learn about all aspects of present day greyhound racing in the USA from those with hands on experience. Their network of volunteers includes people who are actively involved in the breeding, raising, training, and rehoming of these wonderful hounds, as well as those who adopt them. To find out more, visit: http://www.greyhoundfacts.org/.

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Do you have any suggestions or questions you would like answered? Let us know in the comments section below!

Spring is Here!

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It seems like it was just yesterday we were cheering everyone on during our Exotic Howliday Jackpot and December Greyt Gifts promotions. Spring has finally arrived and we can’t wait for better weather! There’s nothing like a day of fun in the sun followed by an evening shared with friends, both human and greyhound alike.

The changing of the seasons also means added performances at our favorite tracks. With the increase in action, we can’t help but wonder: what might be in store for us this year? What thrills will we experience this greyhound racing season?

Better weather means more stakes excitement from the tracks you know and love. Currently we’re in the middle of bestbet’s March Mayhem Sweet Sixteen Stakes with Round 2 Part 1 today and Round 2 Part 2 tomorrow, Saturday March 26.

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Every greyt athlete knows how important it is to stretch before a busy day. Our Bonus Bandit prepares for this Saturday’s stakes action by enjoying a luxurious stretch.

Tomorrow is shaping up to be quite the exciting day with plenty of stakes action with international excitement: Saturday is World Cup Day at Meydan Dubai! We will also be following the action during the semi-finals at Naples’ Marathon Championship Stakes; the final round at Tri State in the WVGOBA Juvenile, and the first round of Derby Lane’s Distance Classic! In just a few short weeks Iowa Greyhound Park’s live racing season will be starting up on May 14, 2016!

Be sure to stay on top of it all by viewing our Racing Calendar with post time schedule. You can count on us to keep you up to speed with the latest information.

 

Get in the action with Greyhound Channel! If you haven’t already, sign up for our Inside Lure newsletter, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter, and check back here often.

This Week with The Professor: Bridge Jumping vs. Pool Manipulation

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Last week on This Week with The Professor, we received a question about pool and odds manipulation. Can what appears to be manipulation be chalked up to honest confusion or is it something more dastardly?

QuestionPoolAndOddsManipulationGreyt question, David! Let’s see what The Professor has to say on the subject:

There has been some reporting of possible pool manipulation lately, so I thought it would be a good time to discuss the difference between that and “bridge jumping.”

Pool manipulation is something that originated many years ago when several Las Vegas and Reno casinos tried booking bets on greyhound races. The person or persons who were doing this had someone at the track make large win, place, or show wagers on non-contenders. Because the pools were so small, when those dogs ran out of the money, the payoffs on the winning dogs were huge. Another person in the group would have made large wagers on the logical dogs at the casino, thus reaping big profits. This was quickly spotted and the casinos either stopped booking those bets, set low limits on the amount you could bet, or restricted win, place, and show bets entirely.

Another form of pool manipulation is what has happened on a few occasions lately –   someone makes a big win/place wager on a logical big favorite and then cancels the wagers at the last minute. This has an effect on the final odds. It discourages people from wagering on the dog because the odds are so low, so the final odds are inflated to what they should be. If someone is making a large wager offshore with a service that books wagers, they receive a payoff which is larger than it should be. The tracks usually keep an eye on this and shut down this practice quickly.

“Bridge jumping” is the practice of someone making a very large wager on a prohibitive favorite, usually to show, attempting to get a 5% return on money wagered. The people who attempt this are called “Bridge Jumpers” because if they lose the large wager trying to make a small profit, they may want to go jump off a bridge.

Thanks to David L. for this question! He has received a $2 credit to his Greyhound Channel wagering account.

Do you have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

Spotlight: Guess the Palm Beach Hot Dog!

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We’d like to play a game called “Name that Hot Dog!” Can you identify this week’s rising star athlete only by using the following facts about his racing career?

Here’s some clues to help you figure out which greyt athlete we’re spotlighting this week.

  • Excellence is hereditary. He descends from super-hound KC AND ALL X TONI WORKS.
  • He’s a Rader Racing hot dog who made his debut in November 2015 at Naples-Ft Myers.

Any guesses? How about…

  • After a few trips around the Naples track, he transferred to Palm Beach Kennel Club. He soared through schooling and hit the ground running in the J grade.
  • He’s a sprinter. To quote Palm Beach announcer Mike Jameson, “They’re off and you better not blink!”
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CRAIGIE RENEGADE at Palm Beach. Photo from Palm Beach Kennel Club’s Facebook Page; used with permission from Jeff Prince.

If you guessed our mystery hound was CRAIGIE RENEGADE, nicely done! The clues above paint a greyt picture of his racing career: an impressive youth who has only just begun to wow crowds in not only the Florida circuit, but gaining attention everywhere.

Lately he’s been burning it up at “The Beach,” swiftly moving from grade J to TA in only two and a half short months. On February 22, 2016 he ran a new track record at Palm Beach for the 301 yard sprint. Then he broke the record again. And again. Yes, during his meteoric rise he ran a new track record at Palm Beach a total three times. Three! And it’s still early in the season!

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What a greyt memento! CRAIGIE RENEGADE breaking the 301  yard record at Palm Beach on February 22, 2016. Photo from Palm Beach Kennel Club’s Facebook Page; used with permission from Jeff Prince.

His first record-breaking sprint was on February 22, 2016, where he sizzled across the finish line with a time of 16.34 in the 301 yard sprint:

Not just a flash in the pan, a mere 12 days later, CRAIGIE RENEGADE broke his own record. On March 5, 2016, he showed he’s only getting faster with a new track record of 16.33 in the 301 yard sprint:

Then, on his very next out, on March 12, “The Renegade” flexed his super-sprinter muscles again. He was able to trim a few more milliseconds off his previous track record, flashing across the finish at 16.22 in the 301 yard sprint. Jameson even remarks, “Watch that time!”

Seems like he’s flying around the track. Does he even touch the ground? Super-sprinter indeed!

They say practice makes perfect and it’s clear CRAIGIE RENEGADE is only getting better as time goes on. Sure, his last out on March 16, 2016 had him come in second with BF PAR SNIPE chasing him down in a rematch from March 12v. Hey, you can’t win ‘em all, and you certainly can’t break a track record every single time you’re out.

Since the start of the 2016 season, he’s 14 – 12 – 2. What’s next for him? Congratulations to CRAIGIE RENEGADE, Rader Racing, and all connections on such an exciting early season! We anticipate seeing big things from this monster pup, that’s for sure.
Let us know in the comments if there’s another greyhound we should report on! Have you witnessed an exceptional up and coming greyhound athlete? Share your “hot dog” rising stars with us! If we feature your greyt athlete, we’ll post $2 in wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account!

 

Wednesday Wisdom: Myth Busted #2

Our Wednesday Wisdom is bringing you another busted myth from our pals at Greyhound Facts to help expand your greyhound racing knowledge, whether you are an experienced greyhound racing spectator or are new to the sport. Today, we explain where and how greyhound athletes spend their time off the track!

Myth: A common misconception about racing greyhounds is that they spend the majority of their lives confined to small cages with little human contact.

Fact: Dogs spend an average of 12-18 hours each day sleeping or resting (with most greyhounds closer to the high end) regardless of whether they are loose or crated, in a home or at the track. At the track, that sleep and rest time is spent in comfortable, individual crates.

The regulation track crates are larger than the crates typically used in homes for pet greyhounds. They can comfortably stand, stretch out, roach, or even share space with their favorite trainer in those crates. When visiting a racing kennel, it is quite obvious from the dogs’ behavior that they are comfortable, content, and secure in their crates.

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As professional athletes, racing greyhounds also have to receive appropriate exercise and activity to stay in shape and perform their best. They spend the rest of their time playing and hanging out with their kennel mates in the turn out pens, interacting with their trainers and kennel staff, and being checked over thoroughly and massaged to make sure they are sound before and after their races. Time is also spent training to race, as well as racing.

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Greyhound Facts is a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Their mission is to provide a place to learn about all aspects of present day greyhound racing in the USA from those with hands on experience. Their network of volunteers includes people who are actively involved in the breeding, raising, training, and rehoming of these wonderful hounds, as well as those who adopt them. To find out more, visit: http://www.greyhoundfacts.org/.

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Do you have any suggestions or questions you would like answered? Let us know in the comments section below!

Spotlight: Off to the Races with Greyhound Facts

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Each day one of our in-house handicappers analyzes handicapping forms to create professional and insightful daily program picks for you. Our PPOD (Paydog Pick of the Day) is a daily feature unique to Greyhound Channel. Our handicappers are usually in the money with their daily PPOD and we’re pretty proud of what they do.

Did you see our PPOD for March 10th, 2016? Here’s what The Professor had to say about the race:

PPOD 3-10-16

The Professor’s PPOD picks paid for the trifecta, pretty exciting! We singled BOC’S EASY PEASY who took the lead early (had a greyt payout too). In case you missed it, here’s the race replay:

What do you get when you have a field of skilled athletes who are moving at hyperspeed to challenge each other for the win? Greyhound racing is the most exciting 30 seconds of sports out there, with the best of the best greyhound athletes challenging each other for victory.

While watching the races, have you ever stopped and wondered how exactly the greyhound came to be in this moment? It’s not as though they were born and immediately were selected to be featured in our PPOD. What’s the process for the pup during their adolescence, when they’re still learning basic commands, socialization; before the racing blanket would even fit their furry frames? When does training start and how exactly do greyhounds progress into their professional careers of racing?

 

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Our friends at Greyhound Facts offer a wealth of information on this subject. First, a brief bio on them: Greyhound Facts is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the education of the general public by providing unbiased, honest information on racing greyhounds and track experiences. They have a well-built website brimming with information including general information, helpful resources, a blog, and photo galleries.

For our article today, we’ll be taking an excerpt from GreyhoundFacts.org’s “Off to the Races” feature, which explains the greyhound’s journey from pup to sleek greyhound.

The Start of their Professional Careers

By 15-18 months of age most of the pups are ready to move to the track and begin their professional racing careers. The training they’ve received on the farm (called finishing) is meant to prepare them for life on the track. They’ll know how to be benched and have their nails clipped, ears examined, etc. They’ll understand the basics of kennel life with turnouts, feeding schedules and training programs. Most importantly, they’ll have the basics of racing: chasing a lure, navigating the turns, holding the rail and racing with other dogs.

“Benching” is very important in the care of a racing greyhound. It is much more than just a brief “once over”. The trainer is looking for everything from muscle soreness, bruising, small cuts or sore cuticles to any fleas, ticks, etc.. They are also making sure there is no swelling of the toes or joints. Trainers usually bench the dogs the day after the race in order to catch anything that might be bothering the dog and treat it promptly and appropriately. If something more serious is suspected, such as a bone injury, the dog is taken to the vet for an x-ray.

At all stages of their life the dogs receive a great deal of attention, handling and care from the people around them. They also have a lot of opportunity for play. The reasons for this are obvious: an unhappy dog doesn’t learn quickly or well nor will it run well. A dog that isn’t used to being handled can be difficult to deal with and no one wants a kennel full of unhappy, hard to handle dogs.

Not all pups go to the same track as their littermates and the pup will meet many dogs from other farms. Once they’ve settled in and gotten acquainted with their new kennelmates and trainers, Unofficial Schooling begins.

Schooling

Unofficial Schooling takes place in the morning on the track before the day’s races. Initially the pups are hand-slipped so that the trainers can see how they are running and if they are following the lure. If that goes well they then run out of the starting box, first in pairs, working up to running in groups of four or five. This continues until the trainer feels the pup is ready for Official Schooling.

Official Schooling races are held before the main races. Most dogs run in 2-3 schooling races. These races help the trainer evaluate the dogs. Is the pup ready to move to their Maiden race and begin his career? Should the pup be moved to another track? (different level of competition, different track conditions, etc) Is more schooling necessary?

Racing

  • Schedule

Most dogs race twice a week. It they don’t, they go to the sprint path (which is approximately 500 feet long) to be exercised to keep them in race shape. Dogs who have been out with an injury and need to get back into shape will also be sprinted. Some kennels walk the dogs or take them swimming. Off-days are spent resting in their kennel, outside at turnouts, sleeping, eating, spending time in the whirlpool and being groomed. Although it varies, most kennels turn the dogs out 4-6 times per day. Each turnout can be anywhere from 30 – 90 minutes.

  • Feeding

Racing greyhounds are professional athletes and their diet reflects that. If they are not fed high quality food that meets their needs they won’t be able to perform to the best of their ability.

The meals consist of raw meat, kibble, some kind of carbohydrate (rice, pasta, etc.) and vegetables. Each trainer has their own (secret) formula regarding vitamins, minerals, electrolytes and other supplements.

  • Race Days

On race day, the dogs have their usual turnouts. After being turned out, they are carefully checked (feet, nails, ears, for soreness, etc.) and weighed. This weight is recorded in the kennel log. Some trainers rub their dogs down. They’ll have their morning snack and then rest. About an hour and half before post time of the first race, a kennel employee takes the racers to the track. Here a track employee brings them to the ginny pit where they wait until it’s race time. They are weighed (which is overseen by the track vet, a judge and other officials) and given a tag which indicates which race number they are in and the blanket they will wear. The racers must be within +/- 1.5 pounds of their set weight or they are scratched (unable to race). They may also be scratched if the vet feels they are injured or sick.

Shortly before their race, the leadouts walk the dogs and a urine sample is collected and labeled. In the paddock area, they dress the dogs (put on the racing blankets and muzzles). The dogs are walked onto the track for the post parade and then led back to the starting boxes where they’ll be put in one by one. The announcer introduces the lure, the doors open and the race is on!

After the race, the lure is stopped at the escape turn where the leadouts leash the dogs and hand them back to their trainers. The dogs are given water, cooled down (with hoses, kiddie pools or dip tanks), and the sand is cleaned off, making sure to pay special attention to the eyes and the feet. When they return to the kennels, they are turned out, fed, and rested. Win or lose, they get extra treats!

Racing Career

Once the dogs have won a Maiden Race they move to the graded races starting at Grade D. Depending on their success, they move up or down a grade. Grade A is the highest grade at most tracks although some have AA. Greyhounds may also move from track to track during their career depending on the level of competition, how well suited the track is to their running style or if it’s a seasonal track.

The journey from the pup to the hot dog wearing the #1 blanket is a transformation which requires careful training and dedication. We admire the feats performed by these athletes. We are inspired by the diligence from the trainers, kennels, owners, and handlers; the countless hours of commitment, love, training, and tireless care. By working together, the greyhound’s talent truly shines. In turn, this tenacity is reflected to the world as the proud twinkle in their human counterpart’s eyes.

At Greyhound Channel, we strive to feature honest news and information in order to promote the truth about greyhound racing. We congratulate winners and their connections, talk about industry news, spotlight trainers and kennels, and establish relationships with our customers. Above all, we love greyhounds and connecting with people who share our passion.

We thank Greyhound Facts for sharing our passion and for providing honest information. Be sure to check out their webpage for more information and check out their blog here.

 

“The Start of their Professional Careers” section is taken directly from Greyhound Facts’ website and is used with direct permission. Thank you!

Greyhound Facts is a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Their mission is to provide a place to learn about all aspects of present day greyhound racing in the USA from those with hands on experience. Their network of volunteers includes people who are actively involved in the breeding, raising, training, and rehoming of these wonderful hounds, as well as those who adopt them. To find out more, visit: www.greyhoundfacts.org

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This Week with The Professor: Avoiding Traps

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There’s a reason why it’s one of the most beloved and quoted lines from Star Wars. Being able to spot a trap before it’s too late is priceless. Before you yell, “It’s a trap!” we’ve asked The Professor for some pointers on how to best avoid common greyhound racing traps. What is an example of a common trap and what can we do to avoid it? Help us, Professor, you’re our only hope!

Common “traps” are things which at first glance may appear to be a major factor or good bets, but are really not. Today we are going to discuss the #1 post “trap.” Just because a greyhound draws the one post does not mean that it is a good thing, or a good bet.

Some of the reasons for this are:

• They may be intimidated by the rail and prefer to initiate their run from the middle outside, even if they are inside runners.

• They may be midtrack or wide runners with average early speed and will be trapped inside for the run to the turn by quicker hounds.

• The one post is always overbet and rarely a good value, especially for finishers, as the post for these type of runners is not really a major factor.

The best barometer for whether or not any of these factors are true is to go back on the dog’s history and see what their record is from the one post position. Do some research as to whether the hound will like the post and your efforts will reward you.

Have a question for The Professor? Leave a comment below and you could receive a $2 wagering credit to your Greyhound Channel account if your question is featured!

2015 Rural Rube and Flashy Sir Recipients

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In the Winter 2016 issue of The Greyhound Review (from the NGA), the nominations for both the 45th Rural Rube and the 45th Flashy Sir were announced. There were 47 nominees for the Rural Rube and 20 nominees for the Flashy Sir. It’s always an exciting time of year when we get to speculate on who will earn these prestigious honors, as we relive the moments that molded each greyt athlete.

These honors were created by well-known figure of the NGA, Gary Guccione. He’s the Executive Editor for the Greyhound Review, a popular greyhound magazine put together by the NGA. But what exactly are these greyhound honors? What does it mean to receive the 45th Rural Rube Award? Besides owning a top-hat and cane, what makes you qualified to be the 2015 Flashy Sir?

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RURAL RUBE. Photo courtesy of Greyhound Data

The Rural Rube Award is a throwback to the RURAL RUBE, a powerhouse sprinter from 1937. He had an amazing career record and won so many accolades that his level of success was unheard of at the time. Some compare RURAL RUBE as the 1940’s greyhound-version of Zenyatta since he was not only an amazing athlete but he also loved the crowds who watched him race. In 1940, RURAL RUBE received a gold medal inscribed, “To Rural Rube, The Champion’s Champion.” He retired in 1940 and sired many offspring. In 1963, RURAL RUBE was one of the first three greyhounds (the others being FLASHY SIR and REAL HUNTSMAN) to be inducted into the Greyhound Hall of Fame in Abilene, Kansas. Today, greyhounds who are outstanding sprinters are nominated for this award.

 

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FLASHY SIR. Photo courtesy of Greyhound Data

A few years after RURAL RUBE, FLASHY SIR, a monster pup out of Kansas in 1944, came into the wonderful world of greyhound racing. He was nicknamed “Mr. Greyhound” and was known as the World’s Greatest Greyhound with 60 wins out of 80 starts at 13 tracks, including 13 straight wins. Along with RURAL RUBE, FLASHY SIR was one of the three very first greyhounds to be inducted into the Greyhound Hall of Fame in 1963. Flashy Sir Award nominees are considered for their distance running prowess.

The best greyhound athletes of 2015 topped both lists. If we weren’t impressed before by B’S HEADLINER, MEGA NERFETTA, and PJ REFINED, we certainly are now, as all three pups were nominated for both the sprint and distance awards. What a spectacular achievement!

With both lists comprised of the year’s most impressive greyhound athletes, selecting only one award recipient for each category was incredibly tough. Voters submitted their ballots to the NGA to determine the 2015 award winners, which were announced on March 2nd, 2016.

A milestone for Derby Lane, as this year’s Rural Rube winner announcement marks the 10th time (since 2000) that the winner calls the St. Petersburg track home.

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HUSKER MAGIC, winner of Derby Lane’s $64,000 Sprint Classic

Coincidentally, this is the 7th year in a row that the Rural Rube Award Winner is also the captain of the All-America team. The recipient is also approaching her 100th career win (98 so far). HUSKER MAGIC, Derby Lane’s very own Darling Diva, was selected as the 45th Rural Rube Award Winner. We look forward to watching her bring in the wins once she’s healed from her sprained hock. Congratulations to Abernathy Kennel/Imark Kennels and all connections for receiving this grand honor!

The best distance greyhound for the 2015 Flashy Sir award goes to another Derby Lane athlete. He was the Derby Lane $75,000 Holiday Distance Challenge winner, among other accolades, including in 2015 he recorded the three fastest ⅜ time at Derby Lane.

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HIGHLYCLASSIFIED, winner of Derby Lane’s $75,000 Holiday Distance Challenge

HIGHLYCLASSIFIED, one of the 2015 first All-America team members, received the nod for the 45th Flashy Sir award. Congratulations to John Farmer Kennel/Monte Jacobs and all connections in receiving this impressive honor!

What a bunch of greyt greyhounds. We anticipate a full year of achievements and excitement from these pups; we can’t wait to see what happens next. Congratulations to all those who worked tirelessly throughout the 2015 year and good luck for the coming meets!

 

Check out the NGA’s article for more information on the 2015 Rural Rube and Flashy Sir award winners. To see past year award winners, check out the NGA’s Awards page  and click on “Rural Rube and Flashy Sir Award Winners.”

Learn more about legendary FLASHY SIR: http://data.ngagreyhounds.com/FlashySir.asp

Learn more about legendary RURAL RUBE: http://data.ngagreyhounds.com/RuralRube.asp

Wednesday Wisdom: Myth Busted #1

As many of you know, greyhound racing is an exciting sport full of greyhound athletes and their loving trainers, owners, kennels, and breeders. Unfortunately, there are many myths circulating around greyhound racing that give the general public a misunderstanding of the sport. We have teamed up with Greyhound Facts to bust these myths and give you a better understanding of the ins and outs of greyhound racing. Whether you are an experienced greyhound racing spectator or are new to the sport, we hope the busted myths and/or facts we will provide every other Wednesday, for our new Wednesday Wisdom feature, will help expand your greyhound racing knowledge.

Myth: Racing is illegal in (X) number of states.

Fact: Contrary to what you’ve probably heard, Idaho is the ONLY state where racing greyhounds is illegal. It’s perfectly legal to race Greyhounds in 49 of the 50 states. What is illegal in some of the states is the pari-mutuel wagering, not racing itself, so next time you hear racing is illegal in (x) states, tell them the FACTS.

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Greyhound Facts is a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Their mission is to provide a place to learn about all aspects of present day greyhound racing in the USA from those with hands on experience. Their network of volunteers includes people who are actively involved in the breeding, raising, training, and rehoming of these wonderful hounds, as well as those who adopt them. To find out more, visit: http://www.greyhoundfacts.org/.

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Do you like this new blog feature? Do you have any suggestions or questions you would like answered? Let us know in the comments section below!